3rd Annual Women’s March sparks conversation for rights for all

Bianca Roman, Reporter

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On January 19th of this year, the third annual Women’s March took place all over the world. The first Women’s March was on January 21st of 2017 the day after President Donald 

Trump’s inauguration. Many decided that should be the date the first Women’s March should take place. Just like in the first march there were many signs that were talking about President Trump’s impeachment. Others were about politics, abortion rights, equal pay, equality, and even immigration statutes. People with signs take the opportunity to get creative and use movie references, song references or even quotes. What is also mostly seen are the pink cat ear hats, that are now a statement or a type of comeback. The march focuses mostly on women equality but also many other rights that need attention. Some being immigrant rights, abortion rights, equal pay, Native American rights and many more things that need to be considered. This year, in the United States, there were more than 100,000 people marching. It took place in Los Angeles, Washington DC, Chicago, and many more cities participated in the Women’s March. In some, there were chants about rights and President Trump. Some examples are “

Hey, hey, ho, ho, Forty-five has got to go!” or “If we don’t get it, vote him out!”. When they say Forty-five they are referring to President Trump since he is the Forty-fifth President of the United States. There was even talk about impeaching President Trump during the March. In Los Angeles there were guest speakers, some included the Mayor of Los Angeles and Rep. Katie Hill. Nancy Pelosi, who is a spokesman for House Speaker also made an appearance at the event in DC. She was not planning on going to the event originally but after President Trump would not let her fly out to Afghanistan, she decided to attend. Even though there were not as many people this year there were still people who went out to show support.

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